Tag: Rating: 5 stars


Review: the Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries (1 – 4)

Posted 25 May, 2010 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

by: C.S. Harris

I found out about these books from someone on my flist over at GoodReads; the premise of the series sounded interesting so I checked them out. I won’t post the premise for each of the books but suffice to say that they all take place in the early 19th century in England during its time that it was engaged in the Napleonic Wars. There’s plenty of action, mystery, suspence, espionage, family drama and romance to interest anyone who’s an avid reader of historical fiction. Spoilers ahead!

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Review: North & South

Posted 17 May, 2010 by Lianne in Books / 7 Comments

North and South
By: Elizabeth Gaskell

From her home ground, her father’s comfortably middle-class living in Hampshire and her aunt’s establishment in Harley Street, Margaret is exiled to the ugly northern industrial town of Milton. Surprisingly, her social consciousness awakens. It is intensified by a relationship with the local mill-owner, Thornton, that combines passionate attraction with fierce opposition.

I first read this book back in 2008 after watching the lovely and awesome BBC adaptation starring Daniela Denby-Ashe and Richard Armitage (if you haven’t seen this yet, I suggest you do. Like, now, LOL) and absolutely loved it. It was a while since I’ve read it so I decided last week to re-read the novel again as part of my goals this summer to re-read a number of books on my shelves. Anyways, since I didn’t write a review the first time around, here it is =) Spoilers ahead!

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Review: The Thorn Birds

Posted 12 May, 2010 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

The Thorn Birds
By: Colleen McCullough

The Thorn Birds is a chronicle of three generations of Clearys-an indomitable clan of ranchers carving lives from a beautiful, hard land while contending with the bitterness, frailty, and secrets that penetrate their family. It is a poignant love story, a powerful epic of struggle and sacrifice, a celebration of individuality and spirit. Most of all, it is the story of the Clearys’ only daughter, Meggie, and the haunted priest, Father Ralph de Bricassart-and the intense joining of two hearts and souls over a lifetime, a relationship that dangerously oversteps sacred boundaries of ethics and dogma.

I actually read this book last summer but didn’t get around to writing a review because I was busy packing at the time. Anyways, I actually saw the miniseries a long time ago when my mum was watching it. I understood what was going on story-wise but I was scarred from the whole viewing because of the number of deaths that took place within the span of 45 minutes (bear in mind I was like, seven, when I watched it so I was pretty wigged out). Seeing that actually kept me away from a second viewing of the series for a very long time until last summer, I decided on a whim to try watching—and later picking up the book—again. And this time it wasn’t so bad. Not at all =) Spoilers ahead

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Review: Rebecca

Posted 9 May, 2010 by Lianne in Books / 4 Comments

Rebecca
By: Daphne du Maurier

“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again . . .”

Working as a lady’s companion, the heroine of Rebecca learns her place. Life begins to look very bleak until, on a trip to the South of France, she meets Maxim de Winter, a handsome widower whose sudden proposal of marriage takes her by surprise. She accepts, but whisked from glamorous Monte Carlo to the ominous and brooding Manderley, the new Mrs de Winter finds Max a changed man. And the memory of his dead wife Rebecca is forever kept alive by the forbidding Mrs Danvers . . .

I first hear of this book last year on GoodReads when a number of groups that I belong to read this book as part of their group read. From the non-spoilerish comments I’ve read and the recommendations that were posted, many people enjoyed this book. So I decided to check it out; my copy was a present given to me for my birthday but I only had a chance to read it now. And yeah, I just couldn’t put it down. Spoilers ahead!

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Review: Warbreaker

Posted 4 May, 2010 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Warbreaker
By: Brandon Sanderson

T’Telir, capital of Hallandren, is a colourful city by the sea where gaily dressed crowds bustle through sunny streets and worship heroes who have been reborn as gods. Ruled by the silent, mysterious God King, the pantheon is nourished by offerings of Breath, the life force that keeps thema live and youthful.

Exiled in Idris, the former royal family reluctantly betrothed a princess to the God King. Arriving in T’Telir, she finds both the city and the marriage are not at all what she expected. Her only ally is Lightsong, a god who is skeptical of his own divinity, who fears that war with Idris is inevitable.

Meanwhile, another new arrival in T’Telir, one who bears the sentinent sword Nightblood, makes cunning plans based on the unique magic of Halladren, which uses colour to focus the power of Breath–plans that could change the world.

I read Sanderson’s Elantris last year and was absolutely enthralled by his storytelling. I hadn’t gotten around to his Mistborn trilogy though I heard wonderful things about it too. So when I saw Warbreaker in mass paperback (and so quick too! Could’ve sworn the hardcover came out back in the late autumn), I had to check it out. Spoilers ahead!

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