Tag: Books: Suspense


Review: The Mona Lisa Speaks

Posted 1 November, 2013 by Lianne in Books / 3 Comments



The Mona Lisa Speaks
By: Christopher Angel
Format/Source: Paperback courtesy of the author as part of The Mona Lisa Speaks Book Tour

Brilliant and confident Robertson Ross, an outdoorsy Canadian computer expert hired to update the Louvre’s security system, falls in love with Mathilde, a classic beauty and cultured Parisian art dealer. But, when he discovers that she’s deeply in debt to Jacques Renard, a powerful and dangerous lord of the French criminal underground, he has to embark on the risky and thrilling theft of the Mona Lisa to save her – and their unborn child.

Rob’s biggest problems actually begin after he successfully steals the Mona Lisa and replaces her with a perfect copy. Facing betrayals and double-crosses at all turns, he needs every bit of his intelligence, cunning, courage, and computer skills to stay alive and reunite with his true love. This is a story of thrills, danger, and a Canadian from the frozen North falling in love with Paris.

The premise of this novel caught my attention–art, Paris, a caper with high stakes. Oh, and the main character’s Canadian (it’s always nice to see more Canadian characters in fiction). Strangely enough, despite having been to Paris, I actually didn’t get a chance to go to the Louvre and see the Mona Lisa for myself (should’ve read in advance that the museum was closed on Mondays). Nonetheless I thought it was interesting that this novel featured the museum quite prominently.

This book is part of the Books on France Reading Challenge 2013 that I am participating in.

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Review: The Last Winter of Dani Lancing

Posted 30 September, 2013 by Lianne in Books / 6 Comments

The Last Winter of Dani Lancing
By: P.D. Viner
Format/Source: galley courtesy of Random House via NetGalley

Twenty years ago, college student Dani Lancing was kidnapped and brutally murdered. The killer was never found, and the case has long gone cold. Her parents, Patty and Jim, were utterly devastated, their marriage destroyed. While Jim fell apart, Patty was consumed by the unsolved case. She abandoned her journalism career and her marriage to spend every waking hour searching and plotting. She keeps contact with Tom, Dani’s childhood sweetheart, who has become a detective intent on solving murders like Dani’s. When he finds a lead that seems ironclad, he brings Patty in on it. After years of dead ends, her obsession is rekindled, and she will do anything for revenge, even become a killer herself-dragging her whole family into the nightmare once again, as lies and secrets are uncovered.

The premise of this novel sounded intriguing, in particular how Dani Lancing’s death affected her parents and her childhood sweetheart years after. I was approved of an ARC of this novel by the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This novel will be available on October 8th.

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Review: The Silent Wife

Posted 1 July, 2013 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

The Silent Wife
By: A.S.A. Harrison
Format/Source: galley copy courtesy of Penguin Canada via NetGalley

Jodi and Todd are at a bad place in their marriage. Much is at stake, including the affluent life they lead in their beautiful waterfront condo in Chicago, as she, the killer, and he, the victim, rush haplessly toward the main event. He is a committed cheater. She lives and breathes denial. He exists in dual worlds. She likes to settle scores. He decides to play for keeps. She has nothing left to lose. Told in alternating voices, The Silent Wife is about a marriage in the throes of dissolution, a couple headed for catastrophe, concessions that can’t be made, and promises that won’t be kept.

There’s been a lot of buzz surrounding this book, likening the book to Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl. I haven’t read that book (will probably read it at some point) but I thought the premise of this novel was interesting enough so I requested for a galley copy. I was approved of one courtesy of the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Contains some spoilers ahead!

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Review: Angel Baby

Posted 29 June, 2013 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Angel Baby
By: Richard Lange
Format/Source: Hardback courtesy of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Programme

To escape the awful life she has descended into, Luz plans carefully. She takes only the clothes on her back, a Colt .45, and all the money in her husband’s safe. The corpses in the hallway weren’t part of her plan.

Luz needs to find the daughter she left behind years earlier, but she knows she may die trying. Her husband is El Principe, a key player in a high-powered drug cartel, a business he runs with the same violence he has used to keep Luz his perfect, obedient wife.

I received a copy of this novel courtesy of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers programme. The premise of this novel sounded interesting; as I mentioned in one Top Ten Tuesday list, it even reminded me of BBC America’s Orphan Black in a way because of the theme of the main character wanting to find and get back to her daughter. Of course, that’s where the comparison stops but it was enough for me to check out. Since receiving the novel, I also found out that the film rights were aquired by Warner Bros.

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Review: Mission to Paris

Posted 12 June, 2013 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Mission to Paris
By: Alan Furst
Format/Source: galley courtesy of Random House via NetGalley

Late summer, 1938. Hollywood film star Fredric Stahl is on his way to Paris to make a movie. The Nazis know he’s coming—a secret bureau within the Reich has been waging political warfare against France, and for their purposes, Fredric Stahl is a perfect agent of influence. What they don’t know is that Stahl, horrified by the Nazi war on Jews and intellectuals, has become part of an informal spy service run out of the American embassy. Mission to Paris is filled with heart-stopping tension, beautifully drawn scenes of romance, and extraordinarily alive characters: foreign assassins; a glamorous Russian actress-turned-spy; and the women in Stahl’s life. At the center of the novel is the city of Paris—its bistros, hotels grand and anonymous, and the Parisians, living every night as though it were their last. Alan Furst brings to life both a dark time in history and the passion of the human hearts that fought to survive it.

I’ve always been meaning to read Alan Furst’s books–historical-espionage fiction set during/around World War Two and the Cold War–but for some reason I just never really got around to it. So naturally I was pretty excited to learn that I was approved of a galley copy of this novel from the publishers through NetGalley.

This book is part of the Books on France Reading Challenge 2013 that I am participating in.

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