Tag: Books: Science Fiction


Review: The Fall of Hyperion

Posted 10 November, 2017 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

The Fall of Hyperion (Hyperion Cantos #2)
By: Dan Simmons
Format/Source: Mass market paperback; my purchase

In the stunning continuation of the epic adventure begun in Hyperion, Simmons returns us to a far future resplendent with drama and invention. On the world of Hyperion, the mysterious Time Tombs are opening. And the secrets they contain mean that nothing–nothing anywhere in the universe–will ever be the same.

After reading Hyperion (review), I knew I had to pick up the next book 😛

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Review: Hyperion

Posted 9 November, 2017 by Lianne in Books / 4 Comments

Hyperion (Hyperion Cantos #1)
By: Dan Simmons
Format/Source: Mass market paperback; my purchase

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits the creature called the Shrike. There are those who worship it. There are those who fear it. And there are those who have vowed to destroy it. In the Valley of the Time Tombs, where huge, brooding structures move backward through time, the Shrike waits for them all. On the eve of Armageddon, with the entire galaxy at war, seven pilgrims set forth on a final voyage to Hyperion seeking the answers to the unsolved riddles of their lives. Each carries a desperate hope—and a terrible secret. And one may hold the fate of humanity in his hands.

At long last, I am getting around to reading this book. Hyperion was one of those classics I long heard about but of course I’m notoriously behind when it comes to reading science fiction classics (despite loving the genre). I had picked it up early this year with the aim to actually get around to reading it, which I finally did over the summer.

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Review: The Inverted World

Posted 3 November, 2017 by Lianne in Books / 4 Comments

The Inverted World
By: Christopher Priest
Format/Source: Paperback; my purchase

The city is winched along tracks through a devastated land full of hostile tribes. Rails must be freshly laid ahead of the city and carefully removed in its wake. Rivers and mountains present nearly insurmountable challenges to the ingenuity of the city’s engineers. But if the city does not move, it will fall farther and farther behind the “optimum” into the crushing gravitational field that has transformed life on Earth. The only alternative to progress is death.

The secret directorate that governs the city makes sure that its inhabitants know nothing of this. Raised in common in crèches, nurtured on synthetic food, prevented above all from venturing outside the closed circuit of the city, they are carefully sheltered from the dire necessities that have come to define human existence. And yet the city is in crisis. The people are growing restive, the population is dwindling, and the rulers know that, for all their efforts, slowly but surely the city is slipping ever farther behind the optimum.

Helward Mann is a member of the city’s elite. Better than anyone, he knows how tenuous is the city’s continued existence. But the world—he is about to discover—is infinitely stranger than the strange world he believes he knows so well.

I’d been eyeing this novel for some time; the premise sounded really interesting and different, and it’s considered a science fiction classic. I picked it up in a semi-whim early this year (trying to hit the minimum for free shipping, you know how it is) and got around to reading it last summer at long last as a break from what I had been reading to date.

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Review: The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells

Posted 25 August, 2017 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells
By: Andrew Sean Greer
Format/Source: eBook; my purchase

1985. After the death of her beloved twin brother, Felix, and the break up with her long-time lover, Nathan, Greta Wells embarks on a radical psychiatric treatment to alleviate her suffocating depression. But the treatment has unexpected effects, and Greta finds herself transported to the lives she might have had if she’d been born in a different era.

During the course of her treatment, Greta cycles between her own time and her alternate lives in 1918, as a bohemian adulteress, and 1941, as a devoted mother and wife. Separated by time and social mores, Greta’s three lives are achingly similar, fraught with familiar tensions and difficult choices. Each reality has its own losses, its own rewards, and each extracts a different price. And the modern Greta learns that her alternate selves are unpredictable, driven by their own desires and needs.

As her final treatment looms, questions arise. What will happen once each Greta learns how to stay in one of the other worlds? Who will choose to remain in which life?

When the book first came out, I remember pondering and wondering whether or not to pick it up. I decided in the end to hold on it. After hearing that there were plans on adapting it into a movie, I decided to check it out. I wasn’t thinking of it when I decided to read it, but it seemed fitting to read it coming off the heels of reading Taylor Jenkins Reid’s Maybe in Another Life (review).

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Review: Foundation

Posted 28 November, 2016 by Lianne in Books / 7 Comments

Foundation (Foundation #1)
By: Isaac Asimov
Format/Source: Mass market paperback; my purchase

For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Seldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future — to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire — both scientists and scholars — and brings them to a bleak planet at the edge of the Galaxy to serve as a beacon of hope for a future generations. He calls his sanctuary the Foundation.

But soon the fledgling Foundation finds itself at the mercy of corrupt warlords rising in the wake of the receding Empire. Mankind’s last best hope is faced with an agonizing choice: submit to the barbarians and be overrun — or fight them and be destroyed.

I think I mentioned it in a Sci-Fi Month post a few years ago (Aha! Found said post) that I wanted to read this book but never got around to it. Well, at long last I finally picked this book up, determined to read it–and just in time for Sci-Fi Month this year too 🙂

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