Tag: Books: Drama


Commentary: Richard II

Posted 13 May, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Richard II
By: William Shakespeare
Format/Source: Paperback; my copy
My first review of the play

Banishing his cousin, Bolingbroke, King Richard II prevents a dispute from turning bloody. But Richard is an arrogant and despotic ruler, who listens only to his flatterers. As favour turns against him and Bolingbroke returns to reclaim his land, Richard is grieved to see that the throne given to him by God might be taken from him by men.

You’re reading this right, this is another post about Richard II and yes, you saw a review go up for this play last year (review) as well as my thoughts on The Hollow Crown production (review). I had been thinking a lot about the play since January, namely Bolingbroke’s (or Bullingbrook in the Modern Library edition I have) role in matters that led him to becoming Henry IV. So I decided to revisit the play again (using my shiny Modern Library edition. Sorry, I keep mentioning it…but isn’t the cover pretty? *points* And the extra content so informative 🙂 ).

Read More

Review: All’s Well That Ends Well

Posted 4 May, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

All’s Well That Ends Well
By: William Shakespeare
Format/Source: eBook

Helena, physician’s daughter of humble birth, cures the King of France, and in return is promised the hand of any nobleman she wishes. But the man she chooses, the proud young Bertram, Count of Rosillion, flees to Florence, refusing to consent to the forced marriage unless Helena can pass two seemingly impossible tests. But with the help of the virginal Diana and her mother, Helena uses her wits and wiles to coerce Bertram into submission.

I’m honestly not entirely sure what compelled me to pick up this play as I’ve read this story is so problematic. I think it was seeing bits from a stage production that prompted me to check it out for myself. Also, not that I have paperback copy, but isn’t book over the Modern Library edition of this play so pretty? One of my favourites, I think 🙂

Read More

Review: The Spanish Tragedy

Posted 9 April, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

The Spanish Tragedy
By: Thomas Kyd
Format/Source: Audiobook via LibriVox

The Spanish Tragedy was well known to sixteenth-century audiences, and its central elements–a play-within-a-play and a ghost bent on revenge–are widely believed to have influenced Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

So I’ve exhausted my batch of Christopher Marlowe plays in the TBR pile and now I move on to another Shakespeare contemporary (well, thereabouts, anyhow): Thomas Kyd. Like the brief blurb mentions, some themes of this play may have influenced Shakespeare’s Hamlet (review), namely the wrongly death of Andrea demanding for revenge of what happened to him. With a play titled The Spanish Tragedy, you know things won’t end very well.

Read More

Review: Edward II

Posted 8 April, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Edward II
By: Christopher Marlowe
Format/Source: Audiobook via LibriVox

Tells the story of the Edward II’s reign, fall, and gruesome murder. Marlowe’s dramatization focuses on the relationship between Edward and Piers Gaveston, and indirectly engages the convoluted politics of Marlowe’s time as well as of the recent past. It is an important cultural, as well as dramatic, document from the early modern period for its treatment of sexuality and class.

All right, here we are, the last of the Christopher Marlowe plays I have lined up to listen to. I think there’s only one or two titles after this that I haven’t read by him, but of the well-known ones this is the last of them. It’s been an interesting experience thus far listening to plays by Shakespeare’s contemporary.

Also, hee hee, shiny new Christopher Marlowe author tag 😉

Read More

Review: Tamburlaine

Posted 8 April, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Tamburlaine
By: Christopher Marlowe
Format/Source: Audiobook via LibriVox

From one of England’s greatest playwrights, a remarkably inventive and poetically expressive work that set the form for later Elizabethan dramas. The 2-part romantic tragedy focuses on Tamburlaine — a Mongol warrior whose relentless rise to greatness and power, together with his enormous greed and vanity, culminates in his eventual downfall.

I initially shied away from jumping into the next Marlowe play after listening to The Jew of Malta (review) because this play was divided into two parts; wasn’t entirely feeling up to listening to both at the time. But seeing as I’m in the middle of a Shakespeare kick and in the need of listening to a play, I finally decided to listen to this play 🙂

Read More