Tag: Books: Contemporary


So You Want to Read… (Sarah Addison Allen)

Posted 22 January, 2016 by Lianne in Lists / 4 Comments

So You Want to Read… is a new monthly feature here on eclectictales.com in which I recommend books by particular authors to readers who have never read a book from certain authors and would like to start. I’m always happy to recommend books and certain authors to my fellow readers and bloggers! 🙂

Happy New Year! And with a new year comes a new post for So You Want to Read… 🙂 For this month I decided to go with Sarah Addison Allen. I love her books, they’re like my comfort books whenever I’m feeling blah or I need a break from some heftier read or RL matters. To date I’ve read all of her books except her latest, First Frost, as I’m waiting for it to hit paperback 😉

  • The Girl Who Chased the Moon (review) — Hands down my favourite book by her. I love everything about it–the small town feel, the magical realism elements, the characters, the family aspect, of following your dreams, of second chances at life and love–yeah, this is usually the first book by her that I recommend to other people 🙂
  • The Sugar Queen (review) — Another wonderful read by her, I actually read this book a little later from the others. Definitely has a seasonal feel to it with the snow and everything, but I think readers can relate to the Josey’s plight in stepping out from her mother’s shadow and being comfortable with herself. But all the female characters felt very well-rounded and their respective stories were interesting.
  • The Lost Lake (review) — I consider this her most maturest book to date, probably because of the things that were happening in her personal life at the time before writing this book. But it still has all the hallmarks that make her books so wonderful: that of family, of friendships, of rediscovering yourself and what perhaps you thought you had lost or left behind.



I hope this list helps if you’re interested in checking out Sarah Addison Allen’s books for the first time! What’s your favourite novel by Sarah Addison Allen? Which would you recommend for first-time readers? Or which of her books have you been meaning to check out?

Review: Named of the Dragon

Posted 21 January, 2016 by Lianne in Books / 4 Comments

Named of the Dragon
By: Susanna Kearsley
Format/Source: eBook; my purchase

Although it goes against her workaholic nature, literary agent Lyn Ravenshaw lets herself be whisked off to Wales for the Christmas holidays by her star client, flamboyant children’s author Bridget Cooper. She suspects Bridget has ulterior motives, but the lure of South Wales with its castles and myths is irresistible. Perhaps a change of scene will bring relief from the nightmares that have plagued her since the death of her child.

Lyn immerses herself in the peace and quiet of the charming Welsh village, but she soon meets an eccentric young widow who’s concerned her baby son is in danger—and inexplicably thinks Lyn is the child’s protector.

Lyn’s dreams become more and more disturbing as she forms a surprisingly warm friendship with a reclusive, brooding playwright, and is pulled into an ancient world of Arthurian legend and dangerous prophecies. Before she can escape her nightmares, she must uncover the secret of her dreams, which is somehow inextricably located in a time long ago and far away…

I clearly went through a lot of Susanna Kearsley’s backlist last year, lol. By the time I posed this question, I had about 3 of her books left that I hadn’t read. I decided to pick up this book next of the three because the setting was very different–Wales this time–and unlike the other book, this one had more favourable reviews.

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Review: The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss

Posted 19 October, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss
By: Max Wirestone
Format/Source: eARC courtesy of the publishers via NetGalley

The odds of Dahlia successfully navigating adulthood are 3,720 to 1. But never tell her the odds.

Meet Dahlia Moss, the reigning queen of unfortunate decision-making in the St. Louis area. Unemployed broke, and on her last bowl of ramen, she’s not living her best life. But that’s all about to change.

Before Dahlia can make her life any messier on her own she’s offered a job. A job that she’s woefully under-qualified for. A job that will lead her to a murder, an MMORPG, and possibly a fella (or two?).

Turns out unfortunate decisions abound, and she’s just the girl to deal with them.

I forgot how I found out about this novel–it was through GoodReads somehow–but the premise was awesome enough for me to add it to my wishlist. So I was especially delighted when I was approved an eARC of this book from the publishers through NetGalley to read for review. This book will be available on 20 October 2015.

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Review: Always the Bridesmaid

Posted 6 October, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Always the Bridesmaid
By: Lindsey Kelk
Format/Source: eBook; my purchase

Everyone loves a bridesmaid.
Except Maddie, who’s perpetually asked to be one.
Everyone loves a wedding.
Except Maddie’s best friend, who’s getting divorced.
And everyone loves the way Maddie’s so happy backstage.
Except Maddie herself.
One best friend is in wedding countdown while the other heads for marriage meltdown. And as Maddie juggles her best chance at promotion in years with bridezilla texts and late-night counselling sessions, she starts to wonder – is it time to stop being the bridesmaid?

I started seeing this book around GoodReads and other bookish websites earlier this year. The premise of the novel sounded really interesting–and complicated–not to mention it sounded like the perfect summer read.

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Review: The Little Paris Bookshop

Posted 23 September, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 8 Comments

The Little Paris Bookshop
By: Nina George
Format/Source: eARC courtesy of the publishers via NetGalley

“There are books that are suitable for a million people, others for only a hundred. There are even remedies—I mean books—that were written for one person only…A book is both medic and medicine at once. It makes a diagnosis as well as offering therapy. Putting the right novels to the appropriate ailments: that’s how I sell books.”

Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can’t seem to heal through literature is himself; he’s still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened.

After Perdu is finally tempted to read the letter, he hauls anchor and departs on a mission to the south of France, hoping to make peace with his loss and discover the end of the story. Joined by a bestselling but blocked author and a lovelorn Italian chef, Perdu travels along the country’s rivers, dispensing his wisdom and his books, showing that the literary world can take the human soul on a journey to heal itself.

Internationally bestselling and filled with warmth and adventure, The Little Paris Bookshop is a love letter to books, meant for anyone who believes in the power of stories to shape people’s lives.

Two Three things caught my attention with this novel: the title, the book cover, and the premise of the novel. I love books about books, about characters who love books and recommend books to other people. I received an eARC of this novel courtesy of the publishers in exchange for an honest review. This book was available on 23 June 2015.

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