Tag: Author: Deborah Harkness


Review: Time’s Convert

Posted 6 February, 2019 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Time’s Convert
By: Deborah Harkness
Format/Source: Hardback; my purchase

On the battlefields of the American Revolution, Matthew de Clermont meets Marcus MacNeil, a young surgeon from Massachusetts, during a moment of political awakening when it seems that the world is on the brink of a brighter future. When Matthew offers him a chance at immortality and a new life free from the restraints of his puritanical upbringing, Marcus seizes the opportunity to become a vampire. But his transformation is not an easy one and the ancient traditions and responsibilities of the de Clermont family clash with Marcus’s deeply held beliefs in liberty, equality, and brotherhood.

Fast-forward to contemporary Paris, where Phoebe Taylor–the young employee at Sotheby’s whom Marcus has fallen for–is about to embark on her own journey to immortality. Though the modernized version of the process at first seems uncomplicated, the couple discovers that the challenges facing a human who wishes to be a vampire are no less formidable than they were in the eighteenth century. The shadows that Marcus believed he’d escaped centuries ago may return to haunt them both–forever.

A passionate love story and a fascinating exploration of the power of tradition and the possibilities not just for change but for revolution, Time’s Convert channels the supernatural world-building and slow-burning romance that made the All Souls Trilogy instant bestsellers to illuminate a new and vital moment in history, and a love affair that will bridge centuries.

Readers of this blog know that I am a big fan of Deborah Harkness’ All Souls trilogy. So you can imagine my delight with the announcement that there was going to be another book: Time’s Convert. I usually wait until the paperback is out but I could not in this case and my friend gifted it for Christmas last year.

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Review: The World of All Souls

Posted 15 November, 2018 by Lianne in Books / 1 Comment

The World of All Souls: A Complete Guide to A Discovery of Witches, Shadow of Night, and the Book of Life
By: Deborah Harkness
Format/Source: Hardback; my purchase

A Discovery of Witches introduced Diana Bishop, Oxford scholar and reluctant witch, and vampire geneticist Matthew Clairmont. Shadow of Night and The Book of Life carried Deborah Harkness’s series to its spellbinding conclusion.

In The World of All Souls, Harkness shares the rich sources of inspiration behind her bewitching novels. She draws together synopses, character bios, maps, recipes, and even the science behind creatures, magic, and alchemy–all with her signature historian’s touch. Bursting with fascinating facts and dazzling artwork, this essential handbook is a must-have for longtime fans and eager newcomers alike.

I don’t remember why I stalled on picking up this book…It was probably the price, thinking I didn’t need a complete guide or anything. Who was I kidding? Of course I needed it in my life! lol

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Books: A Batch of Mini-Reviews

Posted 28 January, 2016 by Lianne in Books / 6 Comments

And here we are, first batch of mini book reviews for 2016! Sort of…granted, the reviews featured below were from titles I’ve read in 2015, but no matter, it was an interesting assortment of titles I read towards the end of last year 😛 Included in this batch of reviews are:



So without further ado…

The Last Witness
By: K.J. Parker
Format/Source: eBook; my purchase

When you need a memory to be wiped, call me.

Transferring unwanted memories to my own mind is the only form of magic I’ve ever mastered. But now, I’m holding so many memories I’m not always sure which ones are actually mine, any more.

Some of them are sensitive; all of them are private. And there are those who are willing to kill to access the secrets I’m trying to bury…

I’ve been eyeing the Tor novellas for some time; the stories sound interesting and the artwork for them are fantastic. I decided to pick up this novella first as the premise sounds really interesting and holds a lot storytelling promise and direction. Suffice to say it didn’t disappoint; I found myself really gripped to my eReader, chest tight with anxiety as I read this unnamed narrator’s story as a man who could wipe your worst, most unwanted memories away. It’s eerie what he can do–and why he can be such a dangerous person and/or weapon–and his dubious morals makes him a rather fascinating character to follow. Despite of his faults, which he freely admits to, I found myself strangely rooting for him, hoping that his shady dealings doesn’t catch up with him, even as some of the things he had done were pretty =S

The novella was also interesting in that the narrator finds himself contemplating about memories, how they define us, how they are tied to truth, etc. I really appreciated how these themes weaved in and out of the story, not necessarily on the fore, but it’s there, especially as our narrator proves to be terribly unreliable. The story can be dark, the character flawed and dubious, the worldbuilding interesting enough with a lot of political changes happening in the backdrop, but overall it was a fantastic novella. Definitely worth checking out!

Rating: ★★★★☆

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Review: The Book of Life

Posted 20 May, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

The Book of Life (All Souls’ Trilogy #3)
By: Deborah Harkness
Format/Source: Mass bound paperback; my copy

A world of witches, daemons and vampires. A manuscript which holds the secrets of their past and the key to their future. Diana and Matthew – the forbidden love at the heart of it. After travelling through time in Shadow of Night, the second book in Deborah Harkness’s enchant-ing series, historian and witch Diana Bishop and vampire scientist Matthew Clairmont return to the present to face new crises and old enemies. At Matthew’s ancestral home in France they reunite with their families – with one heart-breaking exception. But the real threat to their future is yet to be revealed, and when it is, the search for the elusive manuscript Ashmole 782 and its missing pages takes on a terrifying urgency. Using ancient knowledge and modern science, from the palaces of Venice and beyond, Diana and Matthew will finally learn what the witches discovered so many centuries ago.

I spent the last week or so re-reading the first two books in the All Souls trilogy, The Discovery of Witches (review) and Shadow of Night (review) in preparation for this novel; you can read my commentaries on these re-reads in this post. And here we are, the final volume in this story. I’ve been waiting a long time to get my hands on the paperback to complete the trilogy (and it looks so pretty altogether) 🙂

Super massive spoilers abound if you haven’t read the first two books in the trilogy (because I’m not putting anything under a spoiler cut)! If you want to read my overall thoughts of the novel, skip to the last paragraph of this review 😉

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Books: A Batch of Mini-Reviews

Posted 18 May, 2015 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

I may not be hosting or taking part in a re-reading challenge or anything this year, but I am continuing my efforts to re-read a few books I haven’t read in a while or re-read a few books before checking out the latest/last installment in a trilogy or series. There are spoilers for some of the following commentaries, so if you haven’t read the book yet, be sure to click on the link redirecting to my original review (which, if there are major spoilers, will at least be behind a cut) 😉

Utopia
By: Thomas More
Format/Source: Mass bound paperback; my copy

In Utopia Thomas More painted a fantastical picture of a distant island where society is perfected and people live in harmony, yet its title means ‘no place’, and More’s hugely influential work was ultimately an attack on his own corrupt, dangerous times, and on the failings of humanity.

I read this book some five years ago when it was released as part of the third cycle of Penguin Great Ideas books. I had been meaning to re-read it again for so long and was prompted to pick it up again earlier this year with Wolf Hall airing. Reading this time around I able to appreciate more why the piece was structured the way it was (structured in a dialogue format akin to the Greek philosopers (Plato comes to mind)) and where the element of criticising his own times came in. It’s fantastical, but at the same time you can see where his society and his beliefs influenced much of the constructs that this utopian society contained.

Rating: ★★★☆☆

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