Meme: Teaser Tuesdays

Posted 8 March, 2010 by Lianne in Meme / 20 Comments

*in attempts to alleviate herself from dwelling over blah-ness at the moment*

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:
– Grab your current read
– Open to a random page
– Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
– Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Should Be Reading

My teaser for this week (a sentence longer than usual): “There was a silence; no one moved. This would be a good spot to save the game, Ned thought. Then restart if my character gets killed. – p. 17, Ysabel by Guy Gavriel Kay.

This is the first novel I’ve ever read by Kay; I’ve heard of him, but I never got around to reading his stuff. The first half was pretty interesting, with a bit of a mystery as to what the heck exactly is going on. My attention seems to be waning in the second part, but that may only be because I’m also thinking about my research proposal assignment and a discussion paper I need to submit on Wednesday *thud* I am interested in checking out his other books though 🙂

Meme: Musing Mondays

Posted 7 March, 2010 by Lianne in Meme / 5 Comments

Musing Mondays2 Today’s MUSING MONDAYS post is about dust jackets.

Do you prefer books with a dust jacket? What do you do with your dust jacket while reading? Leave it on or take it off? (Question courtesy of Kim from Page after Page)

Just One More Page

Um, I guess I’m on the “maybe” about dust jackets. On the one hand, I get annoyed whenever you’re holding the book and the book is sliding on and off from the dust jacket. On the other hand, the dust jacket serves as sort of a first hand protection to the hardcover so the book would last longer. So I guess it doesn’t really matter to me whether the books have dust jackets or not; I also don’t own a lot of books that are in the hardcover format so it’s not really a major issue with me. I do take them off when I’m reading the book though (again, because I get annoyed whenever the book slides out from the dust jacket). xD

Meme: Teaser Tuesdays

Posted 2 March, 2010 by Lianne in Meme / 14 Comments

Am a bit busy at the moment (got a midterm today for Russian that I’m =\ about) but I think I’ll be reading the following book next:

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:
– Grab your current read
– Open to a random page
– Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
– Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Should Be Reading

Teaser for this week: “That discussion had been the start of a long journey, a journey which had taken Feliks from Christianity through socialism to anarchist terror, from Tambov province through St. Petersburg and Siberia to Geneva. And in Geneva he had made the decision which brought him to England.” – p. 25, The Man From St. Petersburg by Ken Follett.

I had read his book Pillars of the Earth last year, which was pretty epic and enjoyable. I knew he wrote a lot of suspense novels and when I read the premise to this novel (historical setting + character from Russia involved = Li’s interest is piqued), I knew I had to check it out =P

Meme: Musing Mondays

Posted 28 February, 2010 by Lianne in Meme / 1 Comment

It’s a bit late as I type this, I’m typing out an assignment as I answer this question and I still have to study for a midterm so please bear with me if my answer’s not making complete sense xD

Today’s MUSING MONDAYS post is about a story format.

How do you feel about books written in a differing format – whether this be journals or letters (epistolary), verse novels, or any other form? Is this something you enjoy? Or do you prefer straight forward chapter prose.

Just One More Page

I usually prefer straight-forward chapter prose; I guess I’m old-fashioned that way, lol. With the third-person narration, you get a sense of the scope of the story from a bird’s eye perspective (if that makes sense; I’m not going to resort to my grade school English class right now to get the terminologies right =P) whereas with something like journals or letters or first person narration, you’ve more or less got only that one perspective going for you in the story. Plus, like the question described it, it’s pretty straight forward, you get a sense of what’s going on and your imagination fills in the blanks =)

But I also like stories written in journal or letter format (when executed nicely, of course). There’s something about journal and letter format that really adds to the depth and perception of the character narrating events, thoughts and feelings. Sometimes journal and letter formats reveal particular things about the character or the way he or she explains an event, which is interesting. I think journal or letter format is great for the more character-centred stories because it’s such an expression of individuality. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society comes to mind as a wonderful example of a story conducted through the form of letters as a narrative (love this book btw; if you haven’t read it, you should =P).

Review: The Cemetery of Secrets

Posted 28 February, 2010 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

The Cemetery of Secrets (also published as Lucifer’s Shadow)
By: David Hewson

In the ancient burial ground of San Michele on an island off Venice, a young woman’s casket is prised open, an object wrenched from her hands, and an extraordinary story begins.

Young academic Daniel Forster arrives in Venice working for the summer in the library of a private collector. When his employer sends him to buy a stolen violin from a petty thief, he ignites a chain of violence, deception, intrigue and murder. Daniel is drawn into the police investigation surrounding a beautiful woman, a mysterious palazzo and a lost musical masterpiece dating back to 1733.

Separated by centuries, two tales of passion, betrayal and danger collide transporting the reader from the intrigue of Vivaldi’s Venice to the gritty world of a modern detective. From the genius of prodigy to the greed of a killer, The Cemetery of Secrets builds to a shattering crescendo – and one last, breathtaking surprise.

So the premise of the story was pretty interesting (Venice, Italy + musical instrument from centuries ago + mystery = what’s not to be intrigued about?), which is why I picked it up. I had read another book by David Hewson before (The Garden of Evil, part of his Nic Costa series), which was also set in Italy; I was actually surprised that he had written a standalone novel as I though the only had the Nic Costa series.

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