Meme: Teaser Tuesdays

Posted 6 June, 2011 by Lianne in Meme / 7 Comments

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:
– Grab your current read
– Open to a random page
– Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
– Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Should Be Reading

My teaser for this week:

“Had a good day?” A woman’s voice; it took him a second to place it. “Lousy,” he said with feeling. And hearing from you doesn’t make it any better, he thought…
– p. 52, Singularity Sky by Charles Stross

Continuing my sci-fi kick as of late, I’ve started reading this book by Charles Stross. I’ve heard good things about his works, a nice mix of science fiction and space opera (I’m still learning the different subgenres within the science fiction genre—I’m definitely into space opera though). The premise is pretty interesting, the idea of humanity out amongst the stars, colonising different planets, some of them rejecting technology. This one particular planet, New Republic, where the story takes place, amuses me and the Russianist in me because it’s based off elements of Eastern European/Imperial Russia/Soviet Union culture and political systems. Definitely looking forward to reading how the story plays out.

Meme: Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 30 May, 2011 by Lianne in Meme / 4 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Top Ten Books That Should Be In A Beach Bag (your perfect beach reads!)

Yay! Summer’s usually the time when I tackle the large books like Dostoevsky and Dickens because they’re not exactly relaxing books to read when you’re neck-deep in academic literature for the most part of the year but I like to mix them up with some exciting but light paperbacks. So the following list is just that ^_~

01. Tell No One by Harlan Coben — I’ve seen his books in the bookstore but I’ve never picked them up. Then I found out that French actor/director/writer Guillaume Canet directed a movie based on this book so I decided to check it out. I actually took it with me to Europe last summer and was absolutely enthralled by the story; it was fast paced and the mystery was intriguing right up to the very end. Totally recommend this book if you’re into suspense and mystery.

02. Any of Daniel Silva’s books — I couldn’t figure out which book to recommend from him so I figure any book by him would be a great start. He’s personally my favourite novelist in the thriller/suspense/espionage genre out there right now; his novels are always totally engrossing, fast-paced filled with great lines and well-rounded characters.

03. One Day by David Nicholls — I read this book earlier this year since the movie’s coming out soon. I liked the premise of the book, focusing on two people and the state of their relationship on the same day year after year. I thought the characters were relatable and the ups and downs relatable to life today. Great beach read.

04. Miss Pettigrew Lives For a Day by Winifred Watson — I read this book last year and absolutely adored it! There was a movie that was adapted a few years ago from this novel and it’s quite close to the novel. But yeah, the novel was just quite wonderful, left me in such a good mood xD

05. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss — I read this book a few summers ago and it was very unique and wonderful piece in the fantasy genre and just an enjoyable read all around with great characterisation. I look forward to reading the next book (it’s out now but I’m waiting for it to hit mass paperback =))

06. Gods Behaving Badly by Marie Philipps — Simply put, this book is hilarious. Totally worth packing into your beach bag if you’re looking for a good laugh.

07. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows — Another book I ready a few summers ago and absolutely adored the story. The novel is told in correspondence and the authors do a wonderful job in bringing these characters to life. I really felt like the characters were my friends at the end of the novel.

08. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough — If you’re looking for a family saga sweeping decades and generations to bring with you, this is definitely the book to check out. The characterisations are amazing and the dynamics and relationships were also interesting to read, definitely kept me going right up to the very last page.

09.Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson — For the fantasy fans reading this list. The world he creates for the premise of this novel and the magic system that governs it is unique and intriguing. And again, another captivating story with great dialogue and fantastic characters. One of my favourite reads from last summer.

10. Where Angels Fear to Tread by C.S. Harris — This is book one of Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr mystery series; there’s five novels in this series so far and they’re quite intriguing. They’re set in the early 19th century in England so it’s both a historical fiction and a mystery as Sebastian St. Cyr sets out to solve murders while tackling with the whole classes issue. Oh, and did I mention Sebastian St. Cyr is like a mix of Mr. Darcy and James Bond? ^_~

And that’s my list for summer beach reads! I would’ve also recommended The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon but this novel has such a particular atmosphere that I would save that for an evening read when it’s dark out instead of the beach—definitely adds to the mood of the story! There were also another few novels that came to mind but I figured they were a little heftier to carry and to read and the beach or a vacation spot is a place where you’d probably want to read something lighter and fun ^_~

Meme: Teaser Tuesdays

Posted 30 May, 2011 by Lianne in Meme / 14 Comments

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:
– Grab your current read
– Open to a random page
– Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
– Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Should Be Reading

My teaser for this week (it’s actually more than two sentences but the whole thing sounded interesting together as a teaser): I don’t have sufficient data to make that estimate,” said Bill. “But I think not. I mean, the place has been here a long time. Surely it won’t blow up just as we arrive.” It was an epitaph if she’d ever heard one. – p. 10, Chindi by Jack McDevitt

I’m back in a major sci-fi mood again (I don’t think it ever went away, really) so I decided to pick up this book. I’ve read another book in his Priscilla Hutchins series, Odyssey, which was pretty good; it’s a very distinct universe this series is operating in. I’m actually reading them out of order but that’s okay for this series.

Review: Suite Francaise

Posted 23 May, 2011 by Lianne in Books / 2 Comments

Suite Francaise
By: Irene Nemirovsky

By the early l940s, when Ukrainian-born Irène Némirovsky began working on what would become Suite Française-the first two parts of a planned five-part novel-she was already a highly successful writer living in Paris. But she was also a Jew, and in 1942 she was arrested and deported to Auschwitz: a month later she was dead at the age of thirty-nine. Two years earlier, living in a small village in central France-where she, her husband, and their two small daughters had fled in a vain attempt to elude the Nazis-she’d begun her novel, a luminous portrayal of a human drama in which she herself would become a victim. When she was arrested, she had completed two parts of the epic, the handwritten manuscripts of which were hidden in a suitcase that her daughters would take with them into hiding and eventually into freedom. Sixty-four years later, at long last, we can read Némirovsky’s literary masterpiece

The first part, “A Storm in June,” opens in the chaos of the massive 1940 exodus from Paris on the eve of the Nazi invasion during which several families and individuals are thrown together under circumstances beyond their control. They share nothing but the harsh demands of survival-some trying to maintain lives of privilege, others struggling simply to preserve their lives-but soon, all together, they will be forced to face the awful exigencies of physical and emotional displacement, and the annihilation of the world they know. In the second part, “Dolce,” we enter the increasingly complex life of a German-occupied provincial village. Coexisting uneasily with the soldiers billeted among them, the villagers-from aristocrats to shopkeepers to peasants-cope as best they can. Some choose resistance, others collaboration, and as their community is transformed by these acts, the lives of these these men and women reveal nothing less than the very essence of humanity.

Suite Française is a singularly piercing evocation-at once subtle and severe, deeply compassionate and fiercely ironic-of life and death in occupied France, and a brilliant, profoundly moving work of art.

This book came at the recommendation of a friend who read it a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. I kept it in my radar but actually got around to reading All Our Worldly Goods first before this novel (which I also enjoyed, though I don’t think I had time to type up a review of sorts). I got a hold of a copy last year but didn’t have time to read it until now. Major spoilers ahead!

Read More

Meme: Teaser Tuesdays

Posted 16 May, 2011 by Lianne in Meme / 9 Comments

TEASER TUESDAYS asks you to:
– Grab your current read
– Open to a random page
– Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
– Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Should Be Reading

My teaser for this week: “‘It’s nice to finally have a face to put with your voice,’ Ben said as they shook hands. ‘After all the advice you’ve given me in the last two months, I figured it was time to find out what you look like.'” – p. 41, The Tenth Justice by Brad Meltzer

After reading a fairly large book as Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (finished it yesterday; I absolutely loved it! So many details to think over and comment on! I posted a blog entry about it yesterday), I figured I needed something lighter. I was scanning my Mum’s shelf (because most of the books on my TBR pile are pretty hefty at the moment and there’s a few I’m deliberately putting off until after my thesis is done and defended) when I came across this book. The premise seemed interesting so here I am reading it =) Seems promising so far.