Review: Time’s Convert

Posted 6 February, 2019 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Time’s Convert
By: Deborah Harkness
Format/Source: Hardback; my purchase

On the battlefields of the American Revolution, Matthew de Clermont meets Marcus MacNeil, a young surgeon from Massachusetts, during a moment of political awakening when it seems that the world is on the brink of a brighter future. When Matthew offers him a chance at immortality and a new life free from the restraints of his puritanical upbringing, Marcus seizes the opportunity to become a vampire. But his transformation is not an easy one and the ancient traditions and responsibilities of the de Clermont family clash with Marcus’s deeply held beliefs in liberty, equality, and brotherhood.

Fast-forward to contemporary Paris, where Phoebe Taylor–the young employee at Sotheby’s whom Marcus has fallen for–is about to embark on her own journey to immortality. Though the modernized version of the process at first seems uncomplicated, the couple discovers that the challenges facing a human who wishes to be a vampire are no less formidable than they were in the eighteenth century. The shadows that Marcus believed he’d escaped centuries ago may return to haunt them both–forever.

A passionate love story and a fascinating exploration of the power of tradition and the possibilities not just for change but for revolution, Time’s Convert channels the supernatural world-building and slow-burning romance that made the All Souls Trilogy instant bestsellers to illuminate a new and vital moment in history, and a love affair that will bridge centuries.

Readers of this blog know that I am a big fan of Deborah Harkness’ All Souls trilogy. So you can imagine my delight with the announcement that there was going to be another book: Time’s Convert. I usually wait until the paperback is out but I could not in this case and my friend gifted it for Christmas last year.

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Review: Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials

Posted 4 February, 2019 by Lianne in Books / 1 Comment

Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials
By: Malcolm Harris
Format/Source: Paperback; my purchase

Millennials have been stereotyped as lazy, entitled, narcissistic, and immature. We’ve gotten so used to sloppy generational analysis filled with dumb clichÈs about young people that we’ve lost sight of what really unites Millennials. Namely:

– We are the most educated and hard-working generation in American history.

– We poured historic and insane amounts of time and money into preparing ourselves for the 21st century labor market.

– We have been taught to consider working for free (homework, internships) a privilege for our own benefit.

– We are poorer, more medicated, and more precariously employed than our parents, grandparents, even our great grandparents, with less of a social safety net to boot.

Kids These Days, is about why. In brilliant, crackling prose, early Wall Street occupier Malcolm Harris gets mercilessly real about our maligned birth cohort. Examining trends like runaway student debt, the rise of the intern, mass incarceration, social media, and more, Harris gives us a portrait of what it means to be young in America today that will wake you up and piss you off.

Millennials were the first generation raised explicitly as investments, Harris argues, and in Kids These Days he dares us to confront and take charge of the consequences now that we are grown up.

I ended up picking up this book after reading an article recently on Buzzfeed, How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation and how it perfectly encapsulated the challenges and realities our generation faces. I was curious to read more analysis on the matter so I picked up this book.

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January Updates

Posted 31 January, 2019 by Lianne in Website / 1 Comment

Guess who’s back (more or less)? Scheduled posts have returned here on the blog, although I’m still a bit behind in catching up with book reviews. How long will this last, it’s hard to say.

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  1. Books reviewed recently: J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fall of Gondolin (review), Agatha Christie’s The Crooked House (review), and Kevin Kwan’s Rich People Problems (review). You can check out all the books I’ve reviewed recently in the book review tag.
  2. One movie was reviewed this month: Ant-Man and the Wasp (review). You can check out all of the past movies I’ve watched and reviewed in this tag.
  3. Comics reviewed recently include Captain Marvel: In Pursuit of Flight (vol. 1) (review) and Justice League: A League of One (review). You can read all of the comics I’ve reviewed over at this tag.
  4. I posted my answers to the 9th Annual End of the Year Book Survey. A little sparse considering how much less I read last year, but there you go.

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And that’s about it about the blog for the month of January! How is your 2019 going so far?

Review: Rich People Problems

Posted 29 January, 2019 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

Rich People Problems (Crazy Rich Asians #3)
By: Kevin Kwan
Format/Source: Paperback; my purchase

When Nicholas Young hears that his grandmother, Su Yi, is on her deathbed, he rushes to be by her bedside–but he’s not alone. It seems the entire Shang-Young clan has convened from all corners of the globe, ostensibly to care for their matriarch but truly to stake claim on the massive fortune that Su Yi controls.

With each family member secretly fantasizing about getting the keys to Tyersall Park–a trophy estate on 64 prime acres in the heart of Singapore–the place becomes a hotbed of intrigue and Nicholas finds himself blocked from entering the premises.

As relatives claw over heirlooms, Astrid Leong is at the center of her own storm, desperately in love with her old sweetheart Charlie Wu, but tormented by his ex-wife–a woman hell bent on destroying Astrid’s reputation and relationship. Meanwhile Kitty Pong, married to billionaire Jack Bing, finds a formidable opponent in his fashionista daughter, Colette

Aww man here we are, last book in the Crazy Rich Asians trilogy. It’s been quite the romp so far…Usually I read these books in the summer time–that’s what I did with the first two books–but decided I needed something light and crazy to read during my Christmas holidays so I decided to pick up this book as my first read of 2019 🙂

Contains some spoilers if you haven’t read either book in the series!

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Review: The Case of Comrade Tulayev

Posted 25 January, 2019 by Lianne in Books / 0 Comments

The Case of Comrade Tulayev
By: Victor Serge
Format/Source: Paperback; my purchase

One cold Moscow night, Comrade Tulayev, a high government official, is shot dead on the street, and the search for the killer begins. In this panoramic vision of the Soviet Great Terror, the investigation leads all over the world, netting a whole series of suspects whose only connection is their innocence—at least of the crime of which they stand accused. But The Case of Comrade Tulayev, unquestionably the finest work of fiction ever written about the Stalinist purges, is not just a story of a totalitarian state. Marked by the deep humanity and generous spirit of its author, the legendary anarchist and exile Victor Serge, it is also a classic twentieth-century tale of risk, adventure, and unexpected nobility to set beside Ernest Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls and André Malraux’s Man’s Fate.

This book has been sitting on my TBR pile for a few years now. It has elements that I like in a novel: set during a period of history that I had studied extensively, a mystery with many implicated elements to it, never really heard of it but hailed as a great novel (okay, not a necessity when I pick up a book but it’s enough to pique my interest, lol.

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