Category: Meme


Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 5 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 9 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten Books That Were A Chore To Get Through OR Ten Books I’ve Most Recently Put Down

I’ve decided to do a mix this week for this theme: books that I struggled to get through but did finish and books that I struggled through and ended up putting down. Sorry, a bit of a negative list this week, but there were a number of books I’ve read recently that were a struggle to finish, regardless of my mood at the time *le sigh* Here we go:

  1. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James — I was pretty sad to put this book down but several chapters in to the book it just seemed to be going nowhere, I didn’t care of the characters, and Henry James has a tendency of meandering off to tangents before getting back on track with the story. I just didn’t need that in my life.
  2. The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (commentary) — Heresy, I know. I finally got around to reading this book this year and it was just such a chore to get through; I just didn’t care for some of Kvothe’s day-to-day parlays at the University, I just wanted the focus to start shifting big time to the Chandrian and stuff. I think the fact that I’m not so big on the school setting any more in my fantasy novels contributed to the struggle here.
  3. How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff — I started reading this once having heard some good reviews about it but then I put it down after two chapters; the main character’s narrative voice was irritating.
  4. The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer (review) — I can see what the author was trying to do with this book but unlike Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life (review) I just didn’t care for the characters or where the story was headed. I finished the book though.
  5. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak (review) — I first read this book when I was in university and told myself I’d revisit it again. Well, I tried doing so earlier this year and just had to put it down; it just didn’t capture my complete attention. I guess this is one of those books that I’ll just never click with.
  6. Worst. Person. Ever. by Douglas Coupland (review) — I like Douglas Coupland’s books but it was a struggle getting through this title…
  7. Selection Day by Aravind Adiga — I was excited to read this book but was sadly disappointed by it. I only read it to the end for the sake of finishing it…And because it was sent to me by the publishers for review.
  8. The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (review) — I was interested in this title but after reading about a fourth of it, I just had to put it down, nothing was holding my attention *le sigh*



And I only made it to eight for this week’s list. Maybe it’s for the best xD What books did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

+++

I mentioned it in my TTT last week but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram 🙂 Cheers!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 29 August, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 12 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten Hidden Gems in X Genre

I always enjoy these kinds of topics but I actually was stuck with a bit of writer’s block trying to think of a genre to focus on for this week’s TTT. In the end I decided to go with Canadian Literature/Books Written by Canadian Writers. Because there’s a ton of gems written by Canadians that need to be read and shared 😀

In no particular order:

  1. Robert Rotenberg’s Detective Ari Greene series (see author tag) — If you love mysteries and courtroom drama, this is definitely a series worth picking up. The author does such a wonderful job in conveying how an investigation unfolds both from the police side and from the courtroom side, not to mention captures the atmosphere of Toronto perfectly.
  2. Forty Words for Sorrow by Giles Blunt (review) — I didn’t know about this mystery series until it was adapted into a television series that aired earlier this year. Very moody, it’s set in northern Ontario, away from the major cities, where resources can be a bit of a crunch. The character dynamics were pretty interesting too. I haven’t read any of the other books in the series but I’d be keen to!
  3. Stony River by Tricia Dower (review) — I was plugging this book quite a bit a few years ago, I thought it was a really interesting character drama set in the 1950s and the contrast between the perfect life and what really lies behind the facade.
  4. Isabelle Lafleche’s J’Adore series (see author tag) — Love fashion and books featuring lawyer protagonists? Then look no further, this series was a lot of fun to read.
  5. The Delusionist by Grant Buday (review) — I picked this book up during a book fair a few years ago and ended up really enjoying it. It’s a coming-of-age novel but it’s also quite a sombre look at what happens to a family that refuses to acknowledge a very difficult and hard past that they’re trying to look past (in this case, the Holodomor in Ukraine that happened the 1930s).
  6. The Mystics of Mile End by Sigal Samuel (review) — Another family drama novel, this time focusing on a Jewish family fractured after the death of its matriarch and the family members’ views on religion and life. The POVs were especially memorable.
  7. The Fledglings by David Homel (review) — This novel sort of stuck with me long after I had finished reading it and I do find myself recommending it time and again as I thought it was an interesting look at family and friendship in the early twentieth century.
  8. The Emperor of Paris by C.S. Richardson (review) — I thought this was a beautifully written novel, short but jam-packed with story and a tour de force throughout twentieth century French history, or at least the first half.



…And actually I can only think up to eight books today, lol. What books and genre did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

+++

Just a bit of a heads up as I never announced it in a previous TTT but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram 🙂 Cheers!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 15 August, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 9 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten book recommendations for ___________

I had to think long and hard for this topic this week as a) I’m painfully behind in my television shows and movies and b) I feel like I’ve covered so many books from all kinds of genres and character types. So for this topic, I decided to just go with quirky reads as I was reading some pretty zany reads around the time that I put this list together 😛

In no particular order:

  1. The Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde (see author tag) — Pretty much my inspiration for this week’s list as I just finished reading two more books from this series at the time that I started thinking about this topic. I love how this series is such a mash-up of genres: alternative timeline/1980s, science fiction, fantasy, mystery, a meta on books/reading/storytelling…It can be pretty funny, pretty zany, but also pretty heartwrenching. It’s a book lover’s delight. If you haven’t read this series, I cannot recommend it enough.
  2. The Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett (see author tag) — I love the worldbuilding in these books and on the outset it may seem like merely fantasy but the satire in these books are absolutely astute and loaded, not the humanity of the characters (ultimately) and of course the quintessential British humour involved.
  3. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (see post) — Never got around to writing a proper review for the novel but the off-beat and dry British humour always reminded me of Terry Pratchett’s books, just set in space. The novel just starts with Arthur Dent just wanting his hangover to go away and he ends up getting whisked off to outer space as Earth is demolished to make way for an interstellar highway. And that’s just the beginning…
  4. The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss by Max Wirestone (review) — Geek culture meets mystery in a Veronica Mars-esque manner (complete with the observations on the people she meets)? Yeah, it makes for a bit of a zany read xD (and yay that there’s another two installments to this series!)
  5. The Dead Mountaineer’s Inn by Boris & Arkady Strugatsky (review) — This book was so quirky! Poor Peter Glebsky just wants to enjoy his downtime in peace and quiet and finds himself not only surrounded by some really strange vacationers staying at the inn but lands himself in the middle of a mystery and odd alien events that felt a bit like an episode of The X-Files.
  6. The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman (review) — Speaking of protagonists who wanted little things and ended up getting thrown into some crazy events, here’s another book with quite the premise: Egon Loeser just wanted to get laid and ends up taking quite the romp across 1930s Berlin and elsewhere…It gets pretty mad. But it’s also pretty funny.

  7. A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian by Marina Lewycka (review) — For something a little less sci-fi-y/genre-mashing, here’s a book set in the contemporary times. The zaniness stems from this Ukrainian family living in England, in particular these estranged sisters trying to deal with their elderly father and this really young woman he wants to marry whom they think is out for his money. This little blurb doesn’t even do it justice, my book review outlined some of the mad things they had to deal with. Hence why it’s on this list 😛



And that’s my list for this week. Couldn’t quite think of ten but seeing as I mentioned a few series this week, it should be enough 😉 Have you read these books/have some of these books on your wish-to-read pile? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 27 June, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 15 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Best Books You’ve Read in 2017 So Far

Pretty straightforward, lol. I can’t believe we’ve already halfway through the year–seems like yesterday we were just ringing in 2017. But then again time has been feeling kind of wonky for me lately xD Anywho, I haven’t been reading as much this year compared to previous years but nonetheless I’ve read some

In no particular order:

  1. The Love Song of Queenie Hennessy by Rachel Joyce (review) — I read The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (review) a few years ago and greatly enjoyed it but this book was beyond precious, I love it even more! Which is surprising in that I didn’t expect to love LOVE it the way I do…It’s a quiet novel but it’s powerful in its look at life and imminent death and love and just the sum of human experience and relationships. If you haven’t read this book I strongly recommend checking it out.
  2. In Search of Duende by Federico Garcia Lorca (review) — It’s no secret that I love Federico Garcia Lorca’s works so when I saw that his essays were compiled in this book, I just had to check it out. It’s an illuminating book discussing that mysterious concept of duende and its relation to Spanish character and culture. Totally up my alley of academic interests, but also informs some of his own works too.
  3. Everything Beautiful Began After by Simon van Booy (review) — After years of eyeing this book I finally read it and it did not disappoint! There are so many wonderful quotations, I could just fill my quotes book with them! But its look at love and time and experiences is quite marvelous too…I sense an early theme running here of the books I love this year 😛
  4. The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes (review) — Another book I only got around to reading now, lol. Again, totally up there in my alley of interests in that it looks at the subject of what it’s like to be a creative under the Stalinist era, the lengths you go to survive to appease the government you’re under and what happens to your artistic integrity in the process. Soviet identity, Russian identity, what is art?…As I mentioned in my book review, where was this book when I was writing my thesis? lol. Brilliant book.
  5. Only Beloved by Mary Balogh (review) — Okay, I’ve been picking and choosing my way through the Survivors’ Club series but I had to pick this book up as it sort of book-ends the other book of hers that I read. Not only is Mary Balogh’s writing wonderful to read, but the story of George and Dora reminds me of Persuasion (review) *happy sigh*
  6. Big Mushy Happy Lump by Sarah Andersen (review) — I love her comics, period. If you haven’t checked out her stuff before, you’re in for a treat–and now she’s compiled them in two books!
  7. Of Yesteryear by Lauren Eden (review) — I love the book cover. I also love her poetry.
  8. The Summer Book by Tove Jansson — My review of this novel won’t be going live until next month but it’s another one of those delightfully quiet reads that I’ve read this year, and perfect for the summer. I thought the characterisations of Sophia and her grandmother were especially well done.
  9. Dusk or Dark or Dawn or Day by Seanan McGuire (review) — A fantastic novella with interesting characters and the concept of the paranormal felt different somehow. I’m becoming quite the fan of Seanan McGuire’s works!
  10. The Return of History by Jennifer Welsh — Hmm, for some reason I thought I had reviewed this book but I guess I didn’t. Anyway this was 2016’s CBC Massey Lecture Series feature and it was an excellent book looking at where we are right now in history, the challenges we face moving forward. Definitely worth checking out if you’re looking for explanations about where we are right now.



And that’s my list for this week! What were some of the best books you’ve read so far this year? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! Happy Tuesday 🙂

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 23 May, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 12 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Summer Reads Freebie

I’m going to use this opportunity to talk about the books I hope to tackle this summer 😀

In no particular order:

  1. Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss — I finished re-reading The Name of the Wind earlier this year. Seriously, there’s nothing really stopping me from reading this book now. Well, except maybe my rather large TBR queue at the moment.
  2. Reconstructing Amelia by Kimberly McCreight — I always associate summer with reading faster reads–thrillers, contemporary rom-com kind of reads. This seems like the perfect summer read to settle into.
  3. The Perfect Girl by Gilly Macmillan — Ditto as the previous listing’s reason. Update: Never mind, I actually read this book recently 😛
  4. Maybe in Another Life by Taylor Jenkins Reid — I’d been eyeing this book forever so may this summer is the summer to read it?
  5. The Summer Book by Tove Jansson — The title of this book says it all, lol.
  6. 300 Days of Sun by Deborah Lawrenson — Another book whose title just screams summer xD
  7. The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer — I think I listed this book under my spring TBR list and I never got around to it. So maybe this summer?
  8. Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien — Ditto as the above, I didn’t get around to reading it this past spring.
  9. China Rich Girlfriend by Kevin Kwan — Another book that just seems perfect for these summer days…
  10. The Book of Twentieth-Century Italian Poetry — For a dose of poetry AND translated texts 🙂



And that’s my list for this week! Have you read any of these? Plan on reading any of these?