Category: Meme


Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 19 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 13 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR List

Wow, I can’t believe we’ve already in the autumn season…Not that I’m complaining, I’m not a fan of hot weather 😛 Initially I had quite a different list set for today but given how busy it’s been for me now that I’m also back in school, I’m keeping my list a wee bit on the light side if possible. Anywho, in no particular order:

  1. All Our Wrongs Today by Elan Mastbi — This book was everywhere earlier this year. I’m hoping to read this for November’s Sci-Fi Month 🙂
  2. Before the Fall by Noah Hawley — I tend to read thrillers whenever I’m locked down with schoolwork so this may or may not be a quick read. Sounds interesting though!
  3. Beren & Luthien by J.R.R. Tolkien — I initially was thinking of reading this during the summer but then for whatever reason felt that this would make for a better autumn read. I think it’s because of the way their story turned out…
  4. Through Black Spruce by Joseph Boyden — The last of his books presently on my TBR pile. I actually read the first chapter or so but then put it down in favour of other books at the time. Nonetheless it sounds like it’ll be an interesting read.
  5. The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot LiveseyJane Eyre influences, you say? Then definitely an autumn read 😀
  6. The Undertaking by Audrey Magee — I’ve been wanting to read this book since it was shortlisted for the Baileys Women’s Prize in Fiction a few years ago. I got my hands on it earlier this year but have yet to read it. I think this season makes it perfect to read this book…
  7. Everyone’s Just So So Special by Robert Shearman — His books make perfect Hallowe’en reading 😀
  8. Dune Messiah et. al. by Frank Herbert — This is actually a re-read. I was hoping to re-read Dune Messiah and Children of Dune in preparation to read the final three books in the series. Unfortunately it looks like I’m going to have a very busy semester so I’m lucky if I even re-read Dune Messiah for Sci-Fi Month. We’ll see.
  9. Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman — Neil Gaiman’s books always make for great autumn reading. I also want to read his preferred edition of Neverwhere so we’ll see!
  10. Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld — This should be a fun read. I hope xD



And that’s my list of books that I hope to get around to reading this autumn 🙂 What books are you hoping to get around to reading? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! Happy Tuesday 🙂

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I mentioned it in my TTT last week but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram 🙂 Cheers!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 12 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 12 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Throwback Freebie

Interesting freebie for this week. Ideally I would’ve gone back to say 10 books I enjoyed in my first year of blogging 10 years ago but unfortunately I wasn’t blogging regularly at the time and my list on GoodReads doesn’t say much as I only really started using GoodReads in 2009…So we’re going to go with 10 books I really enjoyed back in 2008 😛

In no particular order:

  1. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (commentary) — I never got around to blogging my thoughts on this book the first time around but omg was this book pretty life-changing for me in that it opened up so many avenues of interests (everything Spain!) and book preferences (a few books on this list was actually influenced by my experience reading this book). It even influenced my family trip the following year to include Spain xD
  2. The Longest Journey by E.M. Forster (commentary) — I remember readig this during my first semester in grad school but again I never blogged about it the first time as I was so busy then. But it was a reaffirming book that I do revisit time and again.
  3. Ensemble C’est Tout by Anna Gavalda (review) — My first review of the book wasn’t much–I re-read and re-reviewed it again a few years ago–but I picked it up after finding out it was adapted into a movie starring Audrey Tautou and Guillaume Canet. Suffice to say it remains one of my favourite books all around.
  4. The Spanish Bow by Andromeda Romano-Laz (review) — Influenced by reading The Shadow of the Wind I was picking up all kinds of books set in Spain. I didn’t know much about 20th century Spanish history so this book was quite educational for me as well.
  5. The City of Thieves by David Benioff (review) — Before Game of Thrones I knew David Benioff as the guy who wrote this book. Shocking, hilarious, touching, I really enjoyed following the two main characters as they ventured through war-torn Soviet Russia in the middle of the Second World War.
  6. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough (review) — Funnily enough I didn’t get around to reviewing it until 2010 but my thoughts on the book remained quite crystal clear (so much so that my review was quite Tolstoy-long!). I had seen the miniseries when I was quite young and was quite scarred by some of the events early on in the story but the character study is quite fascinating.
  7. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak — Sadly I never wrote a book review of this novel but I was glued to it from the start, it was wondrous, it was harrowing, it spoke of the love of reading and storytelling and books…and yes, it’s one of the books that actually made me cry.
  8. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows (review) — Such a delightful summer read. I have fond memories of reading this book whenever I encounter the title 🙂
  9. Elantris Brandon Sanderson — My first Brandon Sanderson book, I never got around to reviewing it the first time around but I did re-read the 10th anniversary edition of the book last year (review). It remains a favourite of mine.
  10. Sepulchre by Kate Mosse (review) — In terms of atmosphere, I think this book came closest to evoking that sense of place and mystery that I felt whilst reading The Shadow of the Wind. It’s also my favourite book by her xD



And that’s my throwback list, lol. What books did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 5 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 9 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten Books That Were A Chore To Get Through OR Ten Books I’ve Most Recently Put Down

I’ve decided to do a mix this week for this theme: books that I struggled to get through but did finish and books that I struggled through and ended up putting down. Sorry, a bit of a negative list this week, but there were a number of books I’ve read recently that were a struggle to finish, regardless of my mood at the time *le sigh* Here we go:

  1. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James — I was pretty sad to put this book down but several chapters in to the book it just seemed to be going nowhere, I didn’t care of the characters, and Henry James has a tendency of meandering off to tangents before getting back on track with the story. I just didn’t need that in my life.
  2. The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (commentary) — Heresy, I know. I finally got around to reading this book this year and it was just such a chore to get through; I just didn’t care for some of Kvothe’s day-to-day parlays at the University, I just wanted the focus to start shifting big time to the Chandrian and stuff. I think the fact that I’m not so big on the school setting any more in my fantasy novels contributed to the struggle here.
  3. How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff — I started reading this once having heard some good reviews about it but then I put it down after two chapters; the main character’s narrative voice was irritating.
  4. The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer (review) — I can see what the author was trying to do with this book but unlike Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life (review) I just didn’t care for the characters or where the story was headed. I finished the book though.
  5. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak (review) — I first read this book when I was in university and told myself I’d revisit it again. Well, I tried doing so earlier this year and just had to put it down; it just didn’t capture my complete attention. I guess this is one of those books that I’ll just never click with.
  6. Worst. Person. Ever. by Douglas Coupland (review) — I like Douglas Coupland’s books but it was a struggle getting through this title…
  7. Selection Day by Aravind Adiga — I was excited to read this book but was sadly disappointed by it. I only read it to the end for the sake of finishing it…And because it was sent to me by the publishers for review.
  8. The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (review) — I was interested in this title but after reading about a fourth of it, I just had to put it down, nothing was holding my attention *le sigh*



And I only made it to eight for this week’s list. Maybe it’s for the best xD What books did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

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I mentioned it in my TTT last week but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram 🙂 Cheers!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 29 August, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 12 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten Hidden Gems in X Genre

I always enjoy these kinds of topics but I actually was stuck with a bit of writer’s block trying to think of a genre to focus on for this week’s TTT. In the end I decided to go with Canadian Literature/Books Written by Canadian Writers. Because there’s a ton of gems written by Canadians that need to be read and shared 😀

In no particular order:

  1. Robert Rotenberg’s Detective Ari Greene series (see author tag) — If you love mysteries and courtroom drama, this is definitely a series worth picking up. The author does such a wonderful job in conveying how an investigation unfolds both from the police side and from the courtroom side, not to mention captures the atmosphere of Toronto perfectly.
  2. Forty Words for Sorrow by Giles Blunt (review) — I didn’t know about this mystery series until it was adapted into a television series that aired earlier this year. Very moody, it’s set in northern Ontario, away from the major cities, where resources can be a bit of a crunch. The character dynamics were pretty interesting too. I haven’t read any of the other books in the series but I’d be keen to!
  3. Stony River by Tricia Dower (review) — I was plugging this book quite a bit a few years ago, I thought it was a really interesting character drama set in the 1950s and the contrast between the perfect life and what really lies behind the facade.
  4. Isabelle Lafleche’s J’Adore series (see author tag) — Love fashion and books featuring lawyer protagonists? Then look no further, this series was a lot of fun to read.
  5. The Delusionist by Grant Buday (review) — I picked this book up during a book fair a few years ago and ended up really enjoying it. It’s a coming-of-age novel but it’s also quite a sombre look at what happens to a family that refuses to acknowledge a very difficult and hard past that they’re trying to look past (in this case, the Holodomor in Ukraine that happened the 1930s).
  6. The Mystics of Mile End by Sigal Samuel (review) — Another family drama novel, this time focusing on a Jewish family fractured after the death of its matriarch and the family members’ views on religion and life. The POVs were especially memorable.
  7. The Fledglings by David Homel (review) — This novel sort of stuck with me long after I had finished reading it and I do find myself recommending it time and again as I thought it was an interesting look at family and friendship in the early twentieth century.
  8. The Emperor of Paris by C.S. Richardson (review) — I thought this was a beautifully written novel, short but jam-packed with story and a tour de force throughout twentieth century French history, or at least the first half.



…And actually I can only think up to eight books today, lol. What books and genre did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂

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Just a bit of a heads up as I never announced it in a previous TTT but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram 🙂 Cheers!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 15 August, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 8 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten book recommendations for ___________

I had to think long and hard for this topic this week as a) I’m painfully behind in my television shows and movies and b) I feel like I’ve covered so many books from all kinds of genres and character types. So for this topic, I decided to just go with quirky reads as I was reading some pretty zany reads around the time that I put this list together 😛

In no particular order:

  1. The Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde (see author tag) — Pretty much my inspiration for this week’s list as I just finished reading two more books from this series at the time that I started thinking about this topic. I love how this series is such a mash-up of genres: alternative timeline/1980s, science fiction, fantasy, mystery, a meta on books/reading/storytelling…It can be pretty funny, pretty zany, but also pretty heartwrenching. It’s a book lover’s delight. If you haven’t read this series, I cannot recommend it enough.
  2. The Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett (see author tag) — I love the worldbuilding in these books and on the outset it may seem like merely fantasy but the satire in these books are absolutely astute and loaded, not the humanity of the characters (ultimately) and of course the quintessential British humour involved.
  3. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (see post) — Never got around to writing a proper review for the novel but the off-beat and dry British humour always reminded me of Terry Pratchett’s books, just set in space. The novel just starts with Arthur Dent just wanting his hangover to go away and he ends up getting whisked off to outer space as Earth is demolished to make way for an interstellar highway. And that’s just the beginning…
  4. The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss by Max Wirestone (review) — Geek culture meets mystery in a Veronica Mars-esque manner (complete with the observations on the people she meets)? Yeah, it makes for a bit of a zany read xD (and yay that there’s another two installments to this series!)
  5. The Dead Mountaineer’s Inn by Boris & Arkady Strugatsky (review) — This book was so quirky! Poor Peter Glebsky just wants to enjoy his downtime in peace and quiet and finds himself not only surrounded by some really strange vacationers staying at the inn but lands himself in the middle of a mystery and odd alien events that felt a bit like an episode of The X-Files.
  6. The Teleportation Accident by Ned Beauman (review) — Speaking of protagonists who wanted little things and ended up getting thrown into some crazy events, here’s another book with quite the premise: Egon Loeser just wanted to get laid and ends up taking quite the romp across 1930s Berlin and elsewhere…It gets pretty mad. But it’s also pretty funny.

  7. A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian by Marina Lewycka (review) — For something a little less sci-fi-y/genre-mashing, here’s a book set in the contemporary times. The zaniness stems from this Ukrainian family living in England, in particular these estranged sisters trying to deal with their elderly father and this really young woman he wants to marry whom they think is out for his money. This little blurb doesn’t even do it justice, my book review outlined some of the mad things they had to deal with. Hence why it’s on this list 😛



And that’s my list for this week. Couldn’t quite think of ten but seeing as I mentioned a few series this week, it should be enough 😉 Have you read these books/have some of these books on your wish-to-read pile? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! 🙂