Category: Meme


Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 21 November, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 1 Comment

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten Books Iā€™m Thankful For

I did this a couple of years ago for Sci-Fi Month and decided to revisit it again as I’ve read some excellent science fiction since. And as a tad bit of a twist to this week’s topic, I decided to go with sci-fi books I’m thankful to have read. I tried to keep it as books that I’m thankful but not necessarily that I absolutely loved, but you know how it is, your favourites sneak in anyway šŸ˜‰

In no particular order:

  1. Frank Herbert’s Dune books (see author tag) — One of the early sci-fi novels I read, it continues to stay up there as one of the top sci-fi books I’ve ever read. The societal concepts, the themes that it tackles, the politics involved…The series is fantastic. As an aside I had hoped to finished reading the series in time to review it for this year’s Sci-Fi Month (long story, I only read the first three books prior to this year) but alas, got too busy. In the meantime, stay tuned to the rest of the week as I will be posting reviews from books 2 to 4 xD
  2. Douglas Adams’ The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy — Hilarity + British sensibility + science fiction + a very sad robot named Marvin who has all of the best lines? Definitely thankful this book exists and that I got around to reading it.
  3. Dan Simmons’ Hyperion (review) — Goodness, how did I not read this book sooner? It’s epic, it’s sci-fi all around with all of the ideas that it includes, and yet at the heart of the story is about the characters, told in good ol’ Canterbury Tales fashion. Defnitely thankful that I got around to reading this book.
  4. Jules Verne’s books — I often forget actually that I did read his books when I was growing up–and then caught up with some of the other books of his that I hadn’t read a few years ago–but his books were very formative for me in terms of the imagination that his stories bring and just the concepts of science fiction from a 19th century perspective.
  5. Kevin J. Anderson’s Saga of Seven Suns series (see author tag) — I will always be thankful to have finally gotten around to reading this series as it filled the hole in my heart left by favourite space operas like Babylon 5, Dune, and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine šŸ™‚
  6. John Scalzi’s Old Man’s War (review) — Really enjoyed the premise of this novel and am thankful to finally have gotten around to reading it a few years ago as I always heard about it but never got around to reading it, lol!
  7. Issac Asimov’s Foundation (review) — Another classic that I’m so thankful to have gotten around to reading. It was a little different than I had expected but nonetheless I’m happy to have finally read and thankful that I did.
  8. Hannu Rajaniemi’s Jean la Flambeur trilogy (see author tag) — To be honest hard science fiction isn’t really my thing, it usually becomes more about the science than about the story and the characters and I still need the latter to really enjoy the book but this author does such a good job in presenting such crazy complex ideas but it’s still pretty easy to follow the story.
  9. Rachel Bach’s Paradox trilogy (see author tag) — Forever and ever will I be recommending this trilogy because Devi Morris is a badass and scifi stories featuring badass women always makes for a good read šŸ˜€
  10. Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go (review) — To be honest it took me a second read of this novel to really appreciate the book for what it is about and the themes it tackles. Plus, Kazuo Ishiguro is just brilliant, so…



And that’s my Sci-Fi Month-esque list for this week’s TTT! What books are you thankful for? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! šŸ™‚

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 3 October, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 14 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Top Ten Book Boyfriends

I don’t think I do this topic whenever it’s cropped up in the past, but here we are now šŸ™‚

In no particular order:

  1. Eomer from J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings (review #1, #2, #3) ) — He’s just such a greater character, IMO. I also always admired how he was able to rebuild the kingdom to Rohan after the War of the Ring without help (sorry, Aragorn, but the dwarves and elves helped you in Gondor/rebuild Minas Tirith after the War).
  2. Faramir from J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings (review #1, #2, #3) ) — Okay, so I have a few book boyfriends from LOTR, okay? šŸ˜› But he’s such a kind and thoughtful man, I always hated how his father overlooked him so.
  3. Henry Tilney from Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (review) — I always said that of all of Jane Austen heroes, Henry Tilney would be the one I’d likely go for in real life. He’s hilarious, but he’s also kind. And such a good brother, too.
  4. Colonel Brandon from Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility (review) — I always liked his character but it wasn’t until I read Amanda Grange’s Colonel Brandon’s Diary (review) that I just completely fell for the character. The most precious of cupcakes, this guy.
  5. Henry from Taylor Jenkins Reid’s Maybe in Another Life (review) — What can I say, I like a nice guy who happens to be a nurse too šŸ™‚
  6. Elend from Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn trilogy (#1), (#2), (#3) — He had one of the best introductions I’ve ever read, and he’s just a wonderful and supportive character who’s generally pretty optimistic amidst such a bleak time he lived in, as well as the idealist for the future. Also, he’s quite the reader šŸ˜€
  7. Sebastian St. Cyr from Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries by C.S. Harris (see author tag) —
  8. Sebastian Grey from Julia Quinn’s Ten Things I Love About You (review) — So I have a thing for guys named Sebastian, it seems…But no, seriously, I thought his character was great, I had a marvellous time reading his character.
  9. Benedict Bridgerton from Julia Quinn’s An Offer from a Gentleman (review — I have a soft spot too for characters who are overlooked in the family. Benedict is a Bridgerton through and through, but he is quieter compared to his older brother and happy-go-lucky younger brother (and there’s also the youngest but there’s the gap and the youngest wasn’t mentioned as much in the early books). But he’s lovely in his own way.



I’m drawing a blank on a tenth character, but I’m amazed I got nine anyhow! Who are your book boyfriends/girlfriends? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! šŸ™‚

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 19 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 14 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR List

Wow, I can’t believe we’ve already in the autumn season…Not that I’m complaining, I’m not a fan of hot weather šŸ˜› Initially I had quite a different list set for today but given how busy it’s been for me now that I’m also back in school, I’m keeping my list a wee bit on the light side if possible. Anywho, in no particular order:

  1. All Our Wrongs Today by Elan Mastbi — This book was everywhere earlier this year. I’m hoping to read this for November’s Sci-Fi Month šŸ™‚
  2. Before the Fall by Noah Hawley — I tend to read thrillers whenever I’m locked down with schoolwork so this may or may not be a quick read. Sounds interesting though!
  3. Beren & Luthien by J.R.R. Tolkien — I initially was thinking of reading this during the summer but then for whatever reason felt that this would make for a better autumn read. I think it’s because of the way their story turned out…
  4. Through Black Spruce by Joseph Boyden — The last of his books presently on my TBR pile. I actually read the first chapter or so but then put it down in favour of other books at the time. Nonetheless it sounds like it’ll be an interesting read.
  5. The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot LiveseyJane Eyre influences, you say? Then definitely an autumn read šŸ˜€
  6. The Undertaking by Audrey Magee — I’ve been wanting to read this book since it was shortlisted for the Baileys Women’s Prize in Fiction a few years ago. I got my hands on it earlier this year but have yet to read it. I think this season makes it perfect to read this book…
  7. Everyone’s Just So So Special by Robert Shearman — His books make perfect Hallowe’en reading šŸ˜€
  8. Dune Messiah et. al. by Frank Herbert — This is actually a re-read. I was hoping to re-read Dune Messiah and Children of Dune in preparation to read the final three books in the series. Unfortunately it looks like I’m going to have a very busy semester so I’m lucky if I even re-read Dune Messiah for Sci-Fi Month. We’ll see.
  9. Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman — Neil Gaiman’s books always make for great autumn reading. I also want to read his preferred edition of Neverwhere so we’ll see!
  10. Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld — This should be a fun read. I hope xD



And that’s my list of books that I hope to get around to reading this autumn šŸ™‚ What books are you hoping to get around to reading? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! Happy Tuesday šŸ™‚

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I mentioned it in my TTT last week but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram šŸ™‚ Cheers!

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 12 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 13 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Throwback Freebie

Interesting freebie for this week. Ideally I would’ve gone back to say 10 books I enjoyed in my first year of blogging 10 years ago but unfortunately I wasn’t blogging regularly at the time and my list on GoodReads doesn’t say much as I only really started using GoodReads in 2009…So we’re going to go with 10 books I really enjoyed back in 2008 šŸ˜›

In no particular order:

  1. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (commentary) — I never got around to blogging my thoughts on this book the first time around but omg was this book pretty life-changing for me in that it opened up so many avenues of interests (everything Spain!) and book preferences (a few books on this list was actually influenced by my experience reading this book). It even influenced my family trip the following year to include Spain xD
  2. The Longest Journey by E.M. Forster (commentary) — I remember readig this during my first semester in grad school but again I never blogged about it the first time as I was so busy then. But it was a reaffirming book that I do revisit time and again.
  3. Ensemble C’est Tout by Anna Gavalda (review) — My first review of the book wasn’t much–I re-read and re-reviewed it again a few years ago–but I picked it up after finding out it was adapted into a movie starring Audrey Tautou and Guillaume Canet. Suffice to say it remains one of my favourite books all around.
  4. The Spanish Bow by Andromeda Romano-Laz (review) — Influenced by reading The Shadow of the Wind I was picking up all kinds of books set in Spain. I didn’t know much about 20th century Spanish history so this book was quite educational for me as well.
  5. The City of Thieves by David Benioff (review) — Before Game of Thrones I knew David Benioff as the guy who wrote this book. Shocking, hilarious, touching, I really enjoyed following the two main characters as they ventured through war-torn Soviet Russia in the middle of the Second World War.
  6. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough (review) — Funnily enough I didn’t get around to reviewing it until 2010 but my thoughts on the book remained quite crystal clear (so much so that my review was quite Tolstoy-long!). I had seen the miniseries when I was quite young and was quite scarred by some of the events early on in the story but the character study is quite fascinating.
  7. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak — Sadly I never wrote a book review of this novel but I was glued to it from the start, it was wondrous, it was harrowing, it spoke of the love of reading and storytelling and books…and yes, it’s one of the books that actually made me cry.
  8. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows (review) — Such a delightful summer read. I have fond memories of reading this book whenever I encounter the title šŸ™‚
  9. Elantris Brandon Sanderson — My first Brandon Sanderson book, I never got around to reviewing it the first time around but I did re-read the 10th anniversary edition of the book last year (review). It remains a favourite of mine.
  10. Sepulchre by Kate Mosse (review) — In terms of atmosphere, I think this book came closest to evoking that sense of place and mystery that I felt whilst reading The Shadow of the Wind. It’s also my favourite book by her xD



And that’s my throwback list, lol. What books did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! šŸ™‚

Top Ten Tuesdays

Posted 5 September, 2017 by Lianne in Meme / 9 Comments

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created here at The Broke and the Bookish. This meme was created because we are particularly fond of lists here at The Broke and the Bookish. We’d love to share our lists with other bookish folks and would LOVE to see your top ten lists!

This week’s topic: Ten Books That Were A Chore To Get Through OR Ten Books I’ve Most Recently Put Down

I’ve decided to do a mix this week for this theme: books that I struggled to get through but did finish and books that I struggled through and ended up putting down. Sorry, a bit of a negative list this week, but there were a number of books I’ve read recently that were a struggle to finish, regardless of my mood at the time *le sigh* Here we go:

  1. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James — I was pretty sad to put this book down but several chapters in to the book it just seemed to be going nowhere, I didn’t care of the characters, and Henry James has a tendency of meandering off to tangents before getting back on track with the story. I just didn’t need that in my life.
  2. The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss (commentary) — Heresy, I know. I finally got around to reading this book this year and it was just such a chore to get through; I just didn’t care for some of Kvothe’s day-to-day parlays at the University, I just wanted the focus to start shifting big time to the Chandrian and stuff. I think the fact that I’m not so big on the school setting any more in my fantasy novels contributed to the struggle here.
  3. How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff — I started reading this once having heard some good reviews about it but then I put it down after two chapters; the main character’s narrative voice was irritating.
  4. The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer (review) — I can see what the author was trying to do with this book but unlike Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life (review) I just didn’t care for the characters or where the story was headed. I finished the book though.
  5. Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak (review) — I first read this book when I was in university and told myself I’d revisit it again. Well, I tried doing so earlier this year and just had to put it down; it just didn’t capture my complete attention. I guess this is one of those books that I’ll just never click with.
  6. Worst. Person. Ever. by Douglas Coupland (review) — I like Douglas Coupland’s books but it was a struggle getting through this title…
  7. Selection Day by Aravind Adiga — I was excited to read this book but was sadly disappointed by it. I only read it to the end for the sake of finishing it…And because it was sent to me by the publishers for review.
  8. The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton (review) — I was interested in this title but after reading about a fourth of it, I just had to put it down, nothing was holding my attention *le sigh*



And I only made it to eight for this week’s list. Maybe it’s for the best xD What books did you feature on your list this week? Let me know, I’d love to hear from you! šŸ™‚

+++

I mentioned it in my TTT last week but my first poetry collection, Shall I Be a Poet Instead?, is available now online (Lulu/Amazon/The Book Depository/Barnes&Noble/etc.)! You can read more about my writing project and my journey towards its publication over at this blog post and check out some of my poetry over at Instagram šŸ™‚ Cheers!